top of page

PLAY
psychoTHERAPY

Play therapists utilise a range of developmentally appropriate toys to support children experiencing a range of change in their lives, toys are like the child's words and play is the child's language.

Play therapy can support children facing a range of challenges, including anxiety, low self-esteem, social skills/peer relations concerns, family breakdown, bereavement, trauma, bullying, medical 

trauma, neurodivergence, and sibling conflict.

THERAPY SERVICES

 

Play therapists, also known as psychotherapists, are qualified mental health practitioners, often holding a Bachelor's degree in Social Work, Psychology, or another mental health discipline, along with a postgraduate degree specialising in Play Therapy. They specialise in child development and provide support to children facing various challenges, such as adjusting to life changes, diagnoses, or other significant life events, through play.

Using developmentally appropriate toys, play therapists engage with children to build rapport, foster understanding, and support social and emotional development in a safe and secure environment. For children, play serves as the language through which they express inner worries, struggles, and cognitive processes. Play therapy offers a calm, trauma-informed approach tailored to each family/child’s goals and treatment plan.

 

“Isn't this the same as my child playing with me at home?”

Not quite! Play therapy utilises established, and well researched, therapeutic models and practices to encourage a child's pretend play skills, which enhance social, literacy, gross motor, and emotional understanding. Play therapists also provide families with techniques and activities to continue therapeutic progress at home, ensuring continuity.

 

A play therapist's toolkit might include:
  • Puppets/dolls

  • Sand trays

  • Dress-ups

  • Music

  • Dollhouses

  • Action figures

Play therapy can support children facing a range of challenges, including anxiety, low self-esteem, social skills/peer relations concerns, family breakdown, bereavement, trauma, bullying, medical trauma, neurodivergence, and sibling conflict.

 

 

Starting Play Therapy:

First Session:

Once a client is ready to engage, initial sessions are booked for both the parent and child. The parent session gathers background information, discusses concerns, explains play therapy and its benefits, and may involve collaboration with other professionals. In the child's initial 

session, the therapist assesses play skills, builds rapport, and provides a safe space for the child to work through struggles.

 

 

Future Sessions:

During subsequent sessions, which typically last 45-50 minutes, the therapist facilitates conversations led by the child or therapist, using toys and activities to process topics. They may employ non-directive or directive approaches, such as "Learn to Play," focusing on six core 

areas of pretend play skills.

 

 

In ongoing sessions, your child benefits from dedicated time with the therapist to build trust and address their needs. Parents are invited to join in the final minutes to discuss session topics and collaborate on next steps.

Playing with Baby Doll

These charges are in line with NDIS hourly rates for service provision by an Allied Health Professional as of July 2023 which are $214.41 for Psychology service and $193.99 for other Allied Health therapies.

costs

*Current as of

4 March 2024

These charges are in line with NDIS hourly rates for service provision by an Allied Health Professional as of July 2023 which are $214.41 for Psychology services and $193.99 for other Allied Health therapies.

$

193.99

per hour session

bottom of page